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Frequently Asked Questions

Impoundable Violations

DOTC-LTO (MC 89-105)

The following violations shall cause the impounding of a motor vehicle:
(Sec. 73, MC 89-105)

  • Unregistered/Improperly registered/delinquent or invalid registration
  • Unregistered substitute or replacement motor, vehicle engine, engine block or chassis
  • Unauthorized change of color or configuration
  • Operating, allowing the operation of a motor vehicle with a suspended or revoked Certificate of Registration
  • Using license plates different from the body number
  • Illegal Transfer of plates, tags, or stickers
  • Violations involving absence of required parts, accessories or devices or defective parts, accessories or devices which pose danger to the public
  • Authorized route not properly painted
  • Unauthorized/improvised number plates
  • Failure to paint on vehicle business or trade name
  • Failure to paint required markings
  • No body number (for PUV)
  • Using radio or stereo in violation of existing regulation or without the necessary permit, or in breach of the condition in permit regulation.
  • Installation of jalousies, curtains, dim colored lights, strobe lights, dancing lights or similar lights, colored tinted or painted windshield on window glass on "for hire" vehicles

In addition, the following violations shall also cause the impounding of the motor vehicle:

  • Driving without a license plate
  • Fake drivers license/TVR
  • Fake sticker
  • Fake license plate
  • Fake Official Receipt and Certificate of Registration
  • Tampered documents pertaining to franchising, registration and licensing
  • Failure to present any document regarding motor vehicle ATTA
  • Breach of Franchise Conditions
  • Improper use of drivers license
  • Expired drivers license
  • Expired Traffic Violation Receipt

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No Smoking in Public Places Policy: 12 Things You Need to Know (Updated July 6, 2011)

  1. What does a Smoke-Free environment mean?

    SMOKE-FREE refers to an environment where everyone is protected from the hazards of secondhand smoke, in all enclosed workplaces and public places, including restaurants, bars and other hospitality venues.

  2. What are the effects of second - hand smoke?

    • Non-smoking adults who are exposed to second-hand smoke at home or at work have a 25% to 30% increased risk of developing lung cancer.
    • Babies of non-smoking women who are exposed to second-hand smoke during pregnancy are at risk of experiencing a small reduction in birth weight.
    • Maternal milk production is less in smokers compared with non-smokers, and the production decreases as the number of cigarettes smoked per day increases.
    • In infants and children, second-hand smoke exposure causes sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), acute respiratory infections, middle ear disease, more severe asthma, respiratory symptoms, and slowed lung growth.

  3. When will the "No-Smoking in Public Places" take effect?

    After implementing a month-long (June 1-30, 2011) information campaign through warnings given to smokers caught in public places (RA 9211, see below) around Metro Manila, deputized MMDA Environment Enforcers will begin apprehending violators with FINE effective Friday, July 1, 2011.

  4. What are the bases of apprehension?

    1. The Philippines is a signatory to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control Treaty in 2005.

    2. RA 9211, the Tobacco Regulation Act of 2003
      • definition of "public place"- enclosed or confined areas of all hospitals, medical clinics, schools, public transportation terminals and offices, and buildings such as private and public offices, recreational places, shopping malls, movie houses, hotels restaurants and the like." (Section 4 (n))
      • the absolute smoking ban applies to the following public places:
        • centers of youth activity such as schools, preparatory schools, elementary schools, high schools, colleges and universities, youth hostels and recreational facilities for person under 18
        • elevators and stairwells
        • locations in which fire hazards are present, including gas stations and storage areas for flammable liquids, gas, explosives or combustible materials
        • within the buildings and premises of public and private hospitals, medical, dental and optical clinics, health centers, nursing homes, dispensaries and laboratories
        • public conveyances and public facilities including airport and ship terminals and train and bus stations, restaurants and conference halls, except for separate smoking areas. (Section 5)
      • because of the overarching definition of public places, the foregoing enumeration is construed to mean only such places which are enclosed or confined
      • Section 6 of the Act refers to areas where smoking is restricted. Owners/proprietors/administrators of such areas are required to designate smoking/non-smoking areas:
        • all enclosed spaces open to the general public;
        • private workplaces; and
        • other places not covered under Section 5 where non-smokers may be exposed to tobacco smoke

    3. 8749- CLEAN AIR ACT (1999) and its IRR
      • RA 8749, Section 24. Pollution From Smoking.- Smoking inside a public building or an enclosed public place including public vehicles and other means of transport or in any enclosed area outside of one's private residence, private place of work or any duly designated smoking area is hereby prohibited under this Act. This provision shall be implemented by the LGU's.
      • IRR, SECTION 1. Ban on Smoking.- The Local Government Units (LGU's) shall within six (6) months from the effectivity of these Implementing Rules and Regulations, implement or enforce a ban on smoking inside a public building or in any enclosed area outside of one's private residence, private place of work or any duly designated smoking area which shall be enclosed

    4. CSC MEMO CIRCULAR NO. 17-2009 Re: 100% Smoke-Free Environment Policy
      • Legal Basis: RA 9211 and WHO-Framework
      • Salient Provisions:
        • Absolute Prohibition of Smoking in or on the premises, buildings, and grounds of government agencies providing health, education and/or social welfare and development services such as hospitals, health centers, schools and universities, colleges, etc.
        • No "Smoking Areas" shall be designated in such places
        • Exception: An outdoor space designated by the head of agency that meets with defined requirements
        • ashtrays to be removed except in smoking areas
        • Smoking prohibited in government vehicles
        • Building administrators are required to ensure strict compliance with the no-smoking policy
      • Penal Provision: violations shall be ground for disciplinary action pursuant to Rule XIV (Discipline) of the Omnibus Rules Implementing Book V of EO 292
      • The Court's ruling concludes that where no "Smoking Areas" have been designated in a relevant area covered by Section 6 of RA 9211, the smoker should only be warned, not penalized.

    5. The Land Transportation Franchising and Regulatory Board (LTFRB) passed MEMORANDUM CIRCULAR NO. 2009-036 prohibits smoking in all Public Utility Vehicles, and public land transportation terminals;

    6. LGU ORDINANCES/ISSUANCES ON TOBACCO CONTROL/NON-SMOKING
      • Each of the Local Government Unit of Metro Manila has its own policy on tobacco control
      • All cities, except Caloocan, Muntinlupa, Mandaluyong, and Navotas, reiterate RA 9211
      • The cities mentioned above have stricter rules. They have expanded definition of public places to include open spaces to include open spaces or have deleted the word "enclosed" from definition of public places (please see attached for specific details)

  5. Who are the implementing partners of MMDA, and where are their areas of responsibility?

    The implementing partners of MMDA are the 17 LGUs, DOH, Health Justice, UP-College of Law, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control Alliance Philippines, and LTFRB.

  6. How much is the penalty for violating the No Smoking Policy?
    • Penal Provision (Violations of Section 5 and 6 (Smoking Ban, Smoking, Non-Smoking Areas):
      • 1st offense: Php 500 - Php 1,000; or 8-hour community service
      • 2nd offense: Php 1,000 - Php 5,000; or 16-hour community service
      • 3rd offense: Php 5,000 - Php 10,000 and cancellation/revocation of franchise or business permit.

  7. How shall the MMDA apprehend violators within its jurisdiction?

    The MMDA has deputized the Environmental Enforcers monitoring the areas within its jurisdiction in Metro Manila. These Environment Enforcers (EE) are in their mint green polo-shirt uniform (with MMDA logo), with identification cards (both employee ID and Deputation ID) clearly visible and displayed. They are in charge of issuing Environmental Violation Receipts (EVR) to persons caught violating the No Smoking Policy. The EE's ID contains a written Deputation Order, stating the name and deputation number of the EE, his authority to issue EVRs, and until when the order is effective.

  8. What is the MMDA's protocol in deploying Environmental Enforcers?

    Environmental Enforcers will be deployed in teams. Each team leader and an assistant team leader, who will both have the exclusive authority to issue EVRs. These two may be assisted by one photographer and one recorder to document each apprehension made by their team leader or assistant team leader.

    A spotter shall be deployed by the MMDA for each team to monitor possible violators of the agency's regulations. It is the spotter's duty to bring the violator to the Environmental Enforcer for issuance of ticket. The Environment Officer should tell the violator of the details of his/her violation, and the proper payment process.

    MMDA Traffic Enforcers may also assist by playing the role as spotters for the Environmental Enforcers as necessary, should they catch violators smoking in designated non-smoking areas (e.g., drivers or commuters caught smoking while driving/riding in PUVs) in their respective jurisdictions. They shall hand-carry their own "no-smoking" handy placards to reinforce communication to the public.

    MMDA Enforcers deployed in Calooocan, Muntinlupa, Mandaluyong and Navotas shall apprehend violators in accordance to RA 9211. However, they shall serve to assist LGU environmental enforcers as spotters, should they catch violators smoking in public places beyond those stipulated in RA 9211 (again, refer to attached for specific ordinances of abovementioned LGUs)

  9. What is the procedure for payment of administrative fines?

    Upon apprehension, a violator will be given an option to either pay the fine, or to render community service. For payment of fines or rendering of Community Service, the following procedures should be observed:

    Option 1 (Payment at Metrobank)

    1. Just go to the nearest branch of Metrobank and fill-up the payment form (entity number, name, and amount of violation), not more than 7 days after the occurrence of the apprehension. After the payment, make sure to keep the Official Receipt for possible future reference.


    Option 2 (Payment at MMDA Office)

    1. Report to MMDA HPSEPO for Order of Payment of the charged Administrative Fine according to the nature of offense committed

    2. Go to the MMDA Treasury Operations Service for the payment of fine

    3. Submit the initial receipt to HPSEPO for clearance and documentation


    Option 3 (Community Service)

    1. Report to MMDA HPSEPO for proper orientation on the Environmental Regulations Schedule and Instruction

    2. Render Community Service

    3. Go to HPSEPO for clearance and issuance of Certificate of Compliance

  10. What if violators don't pay the fine nor render Community Service?

    If a violator does not show-up within 3-days after receipt of apprehension, he shall be given the 1st summon which will be valid for 15 days. Non-settlement within 15 days will entail receiving the 2nd summon, valid for another 15 days. Should the violator continue to ignore the 2nd summon, the final summon, which is valid for 1 (one) month, will be given to him.

    If the violator ignores the final summon, his case will be filed to the Metropolitan Trial Court of the city where he will be apprehended. Non-appearance in scheduled hearings will mean being given a Warrant of Arrest. His violation will be forwarded to the NBI.

    Failure to pay the administrative fine of P500 or render 8 hours Community Services shall be penalized, after conviction, by a fine of One Thousand Peses (P1,000.00), or imprisonment of three (3) to seven (7) days, or both, at the discretion of the court.

    Failure to pay the administrative fine of P1,000 or render 16 hours of Community Service shall be penalized, after conviction, by a fine of two Thousand Pesos (P2,000.00) or imprisonment of seven (7) days to one (1) month, or both, at the discretion of the court.

  11. If a person has a pending violation of the No-Smoking Policy, will it be possible for him to obtain an NBI clearance? If not, what is the procedure for getting himself cleared from the violation?

    The violator should go to the MMDA and pay his fine. After paying, he should go to the HPSEPO and get his "Motion to Withdraw Information" certificate signed by the Senior Prosecutor of the DOJ. After this, he should bring the "Motion to Withdraw Information" certificate to the concerned Metropolitan Trial Court (MTC). After submitting, the MTC shall give him the "Certificate of No Case". Finally, he should bring said "Certificate of No Case" to the NBI to obtain to obtain his NBI clearance.

  12. Can a violator protest his EVR or file a complaint against an Environmental Enforcer?

    If one feels his EVR was issued without any legal basis or in violation of the protocol, he may contest this by going to the MMDA-HPSEPO Adjudication Office (7th floor MMDA Main Bldg. EDSA cor. Orense St. Guadalupe Nuevo, Makati City) to fill-up the protest form indicating all relevant details regarding his complaint, within 1 week (7 days) after receipt of the apprehension.

ORDINANCE DEFINITION OF "PUBLIC PLACE" FOR 4 LGUs

LGU Definition
Muntinlupa "Refers to gasoline station, banks, malls, town squares, terminals, shopping/business arcades, schools, churches, hospitals, cinema houses, gymnasium, funerals parlors, barber shops, and other similar places where people usually congregate either to while away their time or to listen attend concerts, rallies, program such as, but not limited to veterans Park, Rotary Centennials Parks, C4 (Park), public markets, waiting sheds and patio."
Navotas "Refers to gasoline stations, banks, malls town squares, terminals, shoppings/business arcades, schools, churches, hospitals, cinema houses, gymnasium, funerals parlors, barber shop and ther similar places where people usually congregate either to while away their time or to listen or attend concerts, rallies, programs such as, but not limited to Veterans Park, Rotary Centennial Park, C4 (park), public markets, waiting sheds and patio."
Caloocan "Refers to building or any other structure, whether government or privately owned, that are open to the public by general invitation or other wise, such as but not limited to private work places, offices, schools, hospitals, medical clinic, department stores, malls, markets, supermarkets, restaurant, bars, clubs, nightclubs, lounges, comfort rooms auditoriums, cinemas, private clubhouse, session halls, bus terminals, elevator, hotels libraries, courtrooms, grocery stores, and other similar places where smoking may expose a person other than the smoker to tobacco smoke."
Mandaluyong defines the term "Enclosed Public Places" as "refer (ring) to a building or any other enclose structure, whether government or privately owned, that is open to the public by general invitation or other wise, such as but not limited to private work places, offices, schools, hospitals, medical clinic, department stores, malls, markets, supermarkets, restaurant, bars, clubs, nightclubs, lounges, comfort rooms auditoriums, cinemas, private clubhouse, session halls, bus or airport terminals, elevator, hotels, museums, libraries, courtrooms, grocery stores, ship terminals and other similar places where smoking may expose a person other than the smoker to tobacco smoke."

But section 3 only refers to public places", to wit:

"Section 3. Smoking is strictly prohibited in all public places in Mandaluyong, Metro Manila, except in designated smoking areas; provided, however, that the following public places are hereby declared as absolutely smoke-free areas:
  1. All government /public buildings;
  2. Schools in all levels;
  3. Hospitals/medical clinics;
  4. All enclosed public places with an area of less than one hundred (100) square meters


In relation to the above SECTION, any person having ownership, possession or control of public place not otherwise declared as absolutely smoke-free area may designate separate smoking areas, In the absence of designated smoking area; such public place shall be declared totally a non-smoking area."
  Note: The Implementing Rules provide however, that it shall apply only to "enclosed public place".

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Safety of PH structures during quakes

An article from Inquirer.net by Benito M. Pacheco (First Posted 21:48:00 04/09/2011)

  1. Are magnitude and intensity of an earthquake the same?
  2. They are not. Magnitude is a measure of the energy that is released during an earthquake, while intensity is a description of the variable shaking that is experienced in different areas.

    Intensity is usually written in Roman numerals (for better distinction from magnitude, which is usually in Arabic numbers).

    The magnitude of an earthquake is a single number. For instance, a magnitude 7.2 is expected from the West Valley Fault that transects from Sierra Madre through Metro Manila to Batangas.

    The magnitude scale is logarithmic: between magnitudes 7.2 and 7.3, the increment of energy is about 1.4 times; between magnitudes 7.0 and 8.0, about 32 times!

    The wattage of a light bulb is analogous to the magnitude of an earthquake. The intensity of light or intensity of an earthquake varies according to several factors, including distance from the bulb or distance from the epicenter.

    Other factors that affect earthquake intensity are rock or soil types, ground sublayer, and depth, length and type of fault displacement.

    What intensities can a magnitude 7.2 earthquake from the West Valley Fault generate in Metro Manila?

    According to the 2004 Metro Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study by the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs), the Metropolitan Manila Development Authority and Japan International Cooperation Agency, intensities VIII (very destructive) to IX (devastating) may be experienced alongside Marikina River and near Manila Bay. Lower intensity may be experienced in most of Quezon City.

    In the sense that large-magnitude and high-intensity earthquakes are probable, we may say that Metro Manila has high seismic hazard, as do other regions in the country.

  3. How rampant is the construction of buildings beside or on earthquake faults like the West Valley Fault?
  4. Construction is very rampant beside or on earthquake faults, including the West Valley Fault that transects Metro Manila. Why? And how risky is this situation?

    It was in 2001 that the National Structural Code of the Philippines published the maps by Phivolcs that indicated the active faults in the country. As a result, buildings that were designed and constructed earlier did not take into account the faults.

    Neither did nonengineered houses, even new ones, consider the faults.

    Phivolcs now recommends avoiding construction within 5 meters on each side of a fault trace, or a total width of 10 meters. We may call this the ideal "10-meter wide no-build zone" in the vicinity of a fault.

    Ideally, we should not build in the 10-meter wide no-build zone to avoid the hazard of ground fissure.

    It will be extremely difficult for the foundation of a structure to withstand ground fissures or deformations. In case a bridge or a pipeline cannot avoid crossing a fault trace, a special design will be needed to accommodate dislocations of at least one meter.

    We may also speak of a 10-kilometer wide near-fault zone that requires, since 2001, the highest seismic design forces to withstand ground shaking (in contrast with the hazard of ground fissure in the 10-meter wide no-build zone.)

    At present, the exposure of houses and buildings is very high within the 10-meter wide no-build zone and the 10-km wide near-fault zone.

  5. Is it true that liquefaction or "quicksand effect" is a threat to structures located far from the 10-km near-fault zone?
  6. Yes, the ground may liquefy or turn into quicksand even in areas beyond the 10-km wide near-fault zone.

    If the soil is sandy as in river deltas and coastal areas, the water table is just a few meters below the ground surface. If the ground-shaking intensity is high and sustained for 30 seconds or more, then the soil may liquefy.

    With liquefaction, whole houses and buildings may tilt and even topple.

    Tilting or toppling of structures during liquefaction tends to be slow, giving occupants enough time to evacuate. A permanent tilt or serious sinking may render a structure unusable.

    Deep foundations such as concrete piles, 30 meters deep or deeper, are recommended for large buildings in areas with high liquefaction potential to avoid tilting or sinking.

    There are also ground improvement techniques, meant to solidify the soil beneath and around the foundation, that may be recommended for low-rise structures.

  7. What percent of buildings comply with government standards?
  8. More than 35 percent of low-rise residential buildings in Metro Manila and perhaps in other regions may not be complying with current government standards for construction either because these are nonengineered structures or because these were built according to much older standards that are now inadequate.

    Building construction standards are periodically updated, incorporating lessons learned from recent earthquakes in the country and overseas. Our national structural code was upgraded significantly in 2001 and recently in 2010.

    More than 25 percent of mid-rise buildings may be noncompliant to current standards, mostly due to their use of the older construction code(s) and standards.

    More than 10 percent of very high-rise buildings (above 30 stories), which are relatively new, may be noncompliant. Anecdotal reports indicate that some engineers are inclined or persuaded to "optimize" or "minimize" their structural design to reduce the initial construction cost.

    The cost of the structure of high-rise buildings may be about half of the building cost, the remainder being architectural, electromechanical and other factors.

    Some engineers literally aim for minimum compliance with the standard and code, rather than provide judicious allowance for "surprises of nature."

    In contrast, it is notable that many old buildings were designed and built above the minimum standards that were applicable during their construction. Such buildings, even if old, may be audited and possibly proven adequate even by current standards and code.

  9. What maximum intensity is considered by the current building code?
  10. It is better to ask engineers about the maximum acceleration (movement in meters per second per second) considered by the current code.

    Intensity scale, by definition, is really descriptive rather than truly quantitative. In the Phivolcs earthquake intensity scale from I (1) to X (10), Intensity VIII can be described as "very destructive."

    In Intensity VIII, many well-built buildings are considerably damaged. Concrete dikes and foundation of bridges are destroyed by ground settling or toppling.

    In terms of equivalent acceleration, it may be approximated that 40 percent of the magnitude of acceleration due to gravity (0.4 x G [9.81 meters per second per second]) is considered in seismic zone 4, the zonal classification of most of the country.

    As much as double, or about 0.8G, is considered by the building code for near-fault zones.

    We must note, however, that higher accelerations may still be produced by the maximum credible earthquakes from inland faults such as the West Valley Fault or the Philippine Fault System.

    The building code, in other words, does not even require a design for the maximum conceivable acceleration, but only for the maximum that is likely to occur within the life span of the building.

    The life span of a building is assumed to be 50 years in a typical design.

  11. Which building will experience higher intensity, a low-rise or a high-rise?
  12. Tall buildings will be shaken more by large earthquakes that have their epicenters far away, say 50 km.

    Such earthquakes, which may center in offshore trenches or in a very long inland fault, tend to propagate long-period (low-frequency) vibratory waves that "tune" to the natural vibration periods of tall buildings.

    Low buildings will be shaken more by large or moderate earthquakes from nearby faults, such as the West Valley Fault.

    Near-fault earthquakes tend to propagate short-period (high-frequency) vibratory waves that "tune" to short buildings.

    Hence, every building, whether low-rise or high-rise, needs to be designed to withstand earthquake shaking. The earthquake hazards in the country may come from nearby inland faults and offshore trenches.

  13. Can structures that comply with the national building code escape damage from an earthquake?
  14. No, damage is not precluded by compliance with the minimum requirements of the national building code.

    The minimum standards are aimed at preventing sudden or brittle-type collapse of structures, the kind that will harm or kill some or all occupants.

    A building that follows the minimum standards may still be significantly damaged in the next major earthquake to the point that it will require considerable repairs before it can be reused.

    Unlike in the United States or Japan, we do not provide in the building code the choice of next higher level(s) of design criteria, the kind that will ensure uninterrupted use of the building.

    Some owners of major buildings choose to require their engineers to design for higher performance standards. BPO companies and global semiconductor and electronics plants are among the examples.

    Tougher or more massive structural design is not necessary even in the next higher standard.

    Over the past 10 years, base-isolation technologies for low-rise buildings in which this writer became involved in the seismic design have been introduced in the country.

    Dampers or damping devices against vibrations have also been introduced in a few very tall buildings.

    In a few major projects, worst-case scenario earthquakes have been considered in the analysis and design, over and above the standard requirement of the code.

  15. What is the safest spot in a building during a strong earthquake?
  16. As explained earlier, significant damage may still happen in a well-designed building. During an earthquake, it is generally advisable to stay beside or under sturdy columns, door frames or desks to guard against falling debris.

    Hollow-block walls with little or no steel reinforcement, pieces of furniture, and fixtures on walls and ceilings tend to be hazardous during strong shaking.

    In the extreme event that beams or whole floors are slowly collapsing, vertically supporting elements (the column, door frame or table) may cushion the impact of falling objects or debris.

    It is not advisable to move to higher floor(s). When the strong shaking is over, it is generally advisable to move out of the building, away from falling debris.

  17. Why are building owners not retrofitting or upgrading their structures?
  18. Upgrading or retrofitting of houses or buildings to meet current building standards involves significant costs.

    Indirect costs due to disruption of occupancy during upgrading or retrofitting are also a significant deterrent.

    It is less expensive to design and build with some extra provisions over and above the minimum code requirements than to upgrade or retrofit within 10 years or so.

    In the United States and Japan, the government provides financial and other regulatory incentives to motivate building owners to retrofit.

    The two countries retrofitted most government buildings first, in the process making the retrofitting technologies more familiar to the public and the corresponding costs less prohibitive.

  19. Who is responsible for the structural integrity of a building?
  20. The owner of the house or building is responsible for the structural integrity, including the physical protection of occupants and users.

    Within 15 years of construction, under the Civil Code of the Philippines, engineers (or architects) and contractors (builders) are held liable for any structural failure due to defects in design or construction.

    For buildings and houses that are older than 15 years, the owners are wholly responsible and liable.

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No Physical Contact Policy Apprehension

  1. What law authorizes it?
  2. Republic Act No. 7924 empowers the MMDA to formulate, coordinate, and monitor policies, standards and programs relating to traffic and transport management to rationalize the existing traffic operations and to administer and implement all traffic enforcement operations, traffic engineering services, and traffic education programs. In line with this, MMDA Resolution Number 02-49 was made and implemented.

    MMDA Resolution Number 02-49, approved by the Metro Manila Council, gave authority to the MMDA to adopt a No Physical Contact Program in apprehending traffic violators in Metro Manila thru the use of digital camera. (Click to download MMDA Resolution 02-49)

  3. How does the MMDA apprehend traffic violators through the No Physical Contact Program?
  4. MMDA Traffic Enforcers are strategically placed into different points of the Metropolis in order to capture traffic violators through the use of video cameras. These video cameras record video and take pictures of the actual violations, which are filed as evidence.

    Aside from this, CCTV cameras are also located in high areas of the Metropolis for the same purpose. Duly-authorized personnel operate these cameras for the purpose of monitoring traffic situation in the major thoroughfares and apprehending erring motorists.

    Overspeeding violators along Commonwealth Avenue are caught using a TruCam LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) speed gun that captures the speed of the vehicle and takes a photo and video for evidence. The photo evidence taken by the LIDAR contains the speed captured, time, date, and location of the violation. This photo evidence is attached to the summon sent to the violator.

    After capturing videos and pictures of traffic violators, all of these files are passed to the Non Contact Department for filing and verification. After the files have been verified, a traffic summon will be printed out to be sent to the traffic violator for settlement.

  5. How do you settle your fine after you receive a traffic summon?
  6. Within 7 days after the receipt of the summon, the violator could either proceed to any branch of Metrobank, or to the MMDA Office (EDSA cor. Orense St. Guadalupe Nuevo, Makati City) to settle or pay for his/her violation.

    If the vehicle was driven by another person, kindly ask him to pay for his violation, or send us relevant information such as his name, license number, address, and birthday. If it is a Public Utility Vehicle, kindly include the certified true copy of vehicle dispatch, through the form of a letter within 7 days after the receipt of the summon.

    If the MMDA does not receive any answer from the vehicle owner, it will mean that the owner takes full responsibility over the violation.

  7. How do you contest?
  8. If the driver or the vehicle owner does not agree with the picture of the violation, he may go directly to the MMDA main office to see its actual video footage. If he/she still has questions regarding the violation, he/she may file a formal complaint to the Traffic Adjudication Board (7th floor MMDA Bldg. EDSA cor. Orense St. Guadalupe Nuevo, Makati City), within 7 days after the receipt of the complaint.

  9. Does the No Physical Contact Program mean that enforcers are no longer allowed to apprehend traffic violators using traditional 'contact' apprehensions?
  10. No, the No Physical Contact Program exists together with traditional modes of apprehending traffic violators. Traffic enforcers may still issue citation tickets to traffic violators using traditional 'contact' apprehensions.

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Truck Ban Ordinance

  1. What is the definition of cargo trucks?
  2. Cargo Trucks are motor vehicles, principally intended for carrying cargo and having license plates of the following classifications: "S", "T", "TC", "TH", "TRLB", "HHB", and "TRJ", to include other vehicles such as lorries, vans, tankers or other delivery vehicles, whether loaded or empty, having a gross capacity weight of more than 4,500 kilos.

  3. When and where is the Truck Ban implemented?
  4. From 6:00 am - 9:00 am and from 5:00 pm - 9:00 pm everyday except Sundays and Holidays, no cargo truck shall be allowed to travel or pass along:

    • España Street through Quezon Avenue from Echague Street to the intersection of West and South Avenue;
    • Claro M. Recto Avenue from Legarda St. to del Pan Street;
    • President Quirino Avenue from South Superhighway to Roxas Boulevard;
    • P. Burgos St. through Ayala Boulevard, Legarda St., Magsayasay Boulevard and Aurora Boulevard, from Roxas Boulevard to Boston Street;
    • E. Rodriguez Avenue through Bonifacio Avenue from Welcome Rotonda to Shoe Avenue;
    • South Superhighway through Nagtahan Bridge and Alfonso Mendoza Street from EDSA to Dimasalang Street;
    • Taft Avenue through Quirino Avenue from Redemptorist Street to Plaza Lawton, to include McArthur, Quezon and Jones Bridges;
    • Bonifacio Drive through Roxas Boulevard and NAIA Road to Aduana Street to the Ninoy Aquino International Airport;
    • Rizal Avenue through Rizal Avenue Extension from Carriedo Street to the Bonifacio Monument; and
    • Reina Regente Street through Abad Santos Street from Regina Regente Bridge to Rizal Avenue Extension

  5. Are there any alternate routes intended for cargo trucks who wish to go to and from the Port Area?
  6. Yes there are. The following alternate routes leading to and from the Port Area shall not be included in the ban:

    1. SOUTHERN TRUCK ROUTE
    2. From Port Area to South Superhighway
      Bonifacio Drive, left P. Burgos, Finance Road, Ayala Boulevard, right San Marcelino, left President Quirino, right South Superhighway

      From South Superhighway to Port Area
      South Superhighway, right President Quirino, left United Nations Avenue, right Romualdez Street, left Ayala, P. Burgos, right Bonifacio Drive, to Port Area.

    3. NORTHERN TRUCK ROUTE
    4. From Port Area to North Diversion Road
      From Pier Zone, travelling northward along R-10, right Capulong towards Tayuman, straight ahead towards Gov. Forbes, left Maria Clara, left Dimasalang, right Blumentritt, left A. Bonifacio and find your way to the north.

      From North Diversion Road to Port Area
      From the north and travelling southward along A. Bonifacio Avenue, right Blumentritt, left Aurora Boulevard, right Dimasalang, right Aragon Street, right Gov. Forbes towards Tayuman and Capulong, left R-10 to the Pier Zone.

    5. EASTERN TRUCK ROUTE
    6. From Port Area to Marcos Highway
      From Pier Zone travelling northward along R-10, right Capulong towards Tayuman, straight ahead towards Gov. Forbes, left Maria Clara, cross Dimasalang, straight ahead towards Constancia, right at Constancia, left Laonglaan, straight towards D. Tuazon Avenue, left Quezon Boulevard Extension, straight towards Elliptical Road, take Don Mariano Marcos Avenue, left Aurora Boulevard, straight towards Marcos Highway.

      From Marcos Highway to Port Area
      Marcos Higway straight towards Aurora Boulevard, right at Katipunan, straight towards Tandang Sora, left Don Mariano Marcos Avenue, straight towards Elliptical Road, take Quezon Boulevard Extension, straight towards West Avenue, right West Avenue, left Del Monte Avenue, straight towards A. Bonifacio, left A. Bonifacio Drive, right Blumentritt, left Aurora Boulevard, right Dimasalang, right /aragon Street, right Gov. Forbes towards Tayuman and Capulong, left R-10 to the Pier Zone.

  7. Are there any areas in the Metropolis that implement a "Total Truck Ban?"
  8. Yes, there are. There is a "Total Truck Ban" along Epifanio delos Santos Avenue (EDSA), between Pasong Tamo in Makati and Balintawak in Quezon City/Caloocan City everyday from 6:00 am - 9:00 pm except Sundays, and Holidays.

  9. How much is the fine for violating the Truck Ban Ordinance?
  10. Any person who violates the provisions of this Ordinance shall be punished by a fine of P500.

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Anti-Littering Law: 10 Things You Should Know

  1. What is the Anti-Littering Law?
  2. The Anti-Littering Law is MMDA Regulation No. 96-009 entitled, "PROHIBITING LITTERING/DUMPING/THROWING OF GARBAGE, RUBBISH OR ANY KIND OF WASTE IN OPEN OR PUBLIC PLACES, AND REQUIRING ALL OWNER'S, LESSEES, OCCUPANTS OF RESIDENTIAL, COMMERCIAL ESTABLISHMENTS, WHETHER PRIVATE OR PUBLIC TO CLEAN AND MAINTAIN THE CLEANLINESS OF THEIR FRONTAGE AND IMMEDIATE SURROUNDINGS AND PROVIDING PENALTIES FOR VIOLATION THEREOF", which was enacted into law by the Metro Manila Council on the 22nd Day of August, 1996. The regulation was amended on May 6, 1999 by MMDA Regulation No. 99-006.

  3. When did the Anti-Littering Law take effect?
  4. The law originally took effect on September 15, 1996. The implementation of the law was suspended last August 2002. The law will again be implemented in Metro Manila starting September 16, 2010.

  5. What acts are prohibited by the Anti-Littering Law?
  6. The Anti-Littering Law prohibits the following acts:

    • Littering, Illegal dumping, Illegal disposal of garbage;
    • Urinating, defecating, spitting in a public place;
    • Dirty frontage and immediate surroundings for establishment owners;
    • Improper and untimely stacking of garbage outside residence or establishment;
    • Obstruction (any dilapidated appliance, vehicle, and etc., display of merchandise, illegal structure along sidewalk);
    • Dirty public utility vehicles, or no trash can or receptacle;
    • Spilling, scattering, littering of wastes by public utility vehicles; and
    • Illegal posting or installed signage, billboards, posters, streamers and movie ads., etc.

  7. Who has authority to apprehend violators of this law?
  8. The MMDA will have deputized Environmental Enforcers monitoring the major thoroughfares of Metro Manila. These Environmental Enforcers (EE) will initially be in their mint green polo-shirt uniform (with MMDA logo), with identification cards (both employee ID and Deputation ID) clearly visible and displayed. They will be in charge of issuing Environmental Violation Receipts (EVR) to persons caught violating the Anti-Littering Law. The EE's ID shall contain a written Deputation Order, stating the name and deputation number of the EE, his authority to issue EVRs, and until when the order is effective.

  9. How much is the fine if you violate this law?
  10. The penalties for violating the provisions of the Anti-Littering law, according to the nature of offenses, are as follows:
    Code Nature of Offense Option 1 (Payment of Fines) Option 2 (Render Community Service)
    01 Littering, Illegal dumping, Illegal disposal of garbage P500.00 8 hours (1 day)
    02 Urinating, defecating, spitting in a public place P500.00 8 hours (1 day)
    03 Dirty frontage and immediate surroundings for establishment owners P1000.00 16 hours (2 days)
    04 Improper and untimely stacking of garbage outside residence or establishment P500.00 8 hours (1 day)
    05 Obstruction (any dilapidated appliance, vehicle, and etc., display of merchandise, illegal structure along sidewalk) P1000.00 16 hours (2 days)
    06 Dirty public utility vehicles, or no trash can or receptacle P500.00 8 hours (1 day)
    07 Spilling, scattering, littering of wastes by public utility vehicles P500.00 8 hours (1 day)
    08 Illegal posting or installed signage, billboards, posters, streamers and movie ads., etc. P1000.00 16 hours (2 days)

  11. What is the MMDA's protocol in deploying Environmental Enforcers?
  12. Environmental Enforcers will be deployed in teams. Each team will have a team leader and an assistant team leader, who will both have the exclusive authority to issue EVRs. These two will be assisted by one photographer and one recorder to document each apprehension made by their team leader or assistant team leader.

    A spotter shall be deployed by the MMDA for each team to monitor possible violators of the agency's regulations. It is the spotter's duty to bring the violator to the Environmental Enforcer for issuance of ticket. The Environmental Officer should tell the violator of the details of his/her violation, and the proper payment process.

  13. What are the procedures for payment of administrative fines?
  14. Upon apprehension, a violator will be given an option to either pay the fine, or to render community service. For payment of fines or rendering of Community Service, the following procedures should be observed:

    Option 1 (Payment)

    1. Report to MMDA HPSEPO for Order of Payment of the charged Administrative Fine according to the nature of offense committed.
    2. Go to the MMDA Treasury Operations Service for the payment of fine
    3. Submit the initial receipt to HPSEPO for clearance and documentation

    Option 2 (Community Service)

    1. Report to MMDA HPSEPO for proper orientation on the Environmental Regulations Schedule and Instruction
    2. Render Community Service
    3. Go to HPSEPO for clearance and issuance of Certificate of Compliance

  15. What if I don't pay the fine nor render Community Service?
  16. If you do not show-up within 3-days after the receipt of the apprehension, you will be given the 1st summon which will only be valid for 15 days. If you still don't settle your violation within 15 days, you will be given the 2nd summon which is also valid for 15 days. If you still don't settle your violation after 15 days, the final summon, which is valid for 1 (one) month, will be given to you.

    If you still ignore the final summon, your case will be filed at the Metropolitan Trial Court of the city where you were apprehended. If you do not show up to the scheduled hearings, you will be given a Warrant of Arrest. In addition, your violation will be forwarded to the NBI.

    Failure to pay the administrative fine of P500 or render 8 hours Community Services shall be penalized, after conviction, by a fine of One Thousand Pesos (P1,000.00), or imprisonment of three (3) to seven (7) days, or both, at the discretion of the court.

    Failure to pay the administrative fine of P1,000 or render 16 hours of Community Service shall be penalized, after conviction, by a fine of Two Thousand Pesos (P2,000.00) or imprisonment of seven (7) days to one (1) month, or both, at the discretion of the court.

  17. If I have a pending violation of the Anti-littering law, will it be possible for me to obtain an NBI clearance? If not, what is the procedure for getting myself cleared from the violation?
  18. No, you will not be able to get an NBI clearance. To clear your record, you need to go to the MMDA and pay your fine. After paying, go to the HPSEPO and get your "Motion to Withdraw Information" certificate signed by the Senior Prosecutor of the DOJ. After this, bring the "Motion to Withdraw Information" certificate to the concerned Metropolitan Trial Court (MTC). After submitting, the MTC will give you the "Certificate of No Case." Finally, bring your "Certificate of No Case" so that you'll be allowed to obtain an NBI Clearance.

  19. What do I do if I want to protest my EVR or file a complaint against an Environmental Enforcer?
  20. If you feel your EVR was issued without any legal basis or in violation of the protocol, you may contest by going to the MMDA-HPSEPO Adjudication Office (7th floor MMDA Main Bldg. EDSA cor. Orense St. Guadalupe Nuevo, Makati City) to fill-up the protest form indicating all relevant details regarding your complaint, within 1 week (7 days) after the receipt of the apprehension.

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What To Do During Vehicular Accidents

Minor Accidents

  1. Safety First
  2. The principle concern during a car accident is the safety and well-being of everyone involved. Alight from your vehicle and take pictures of the situation whatever happens.

  3. Do Not Cause Traffic
  4. After that, the drivers should pull their vehicles out of the road immediately so that they're both clear of oncoming traffic. Use flares or cones, if you have them, to alert other drivers, and turn on your hazard lights so that you can be more visible. Call the nearest hospital if anyone has been hurt. Do not leave the scene of an accident--even a minor one--until everything has been resolved to everyone's satisfaction.

  5. Interacting with the Other Driver
  6. Once the initial shock wears off and it's apparent that no one's been seriously hurt, tempers may flare. Refrain from losing your temper. Get the other driver's name, address, contact information and insurance details, and provide the same for him (this is why it's a good idea to carry your insurance information in your vehicle). See if an amicable settlement can be made. If not, call the MMDA hotline 1-3-6, and ask for traffic enforcers/investigators to be present on the scene immediately. Remain at the scene until the investigators arrive and tell you that you can go.

  7. Insurance and Repairs
  8. With the basics taken care of, it's time to see about the damage to your car and how you can go about getting it fixed. If you can, call your insurance agent immediately while you're still at the scene and ask him about repairs. Keep in touch with the traffic investigators, and file a report on the accident if they ask.

Major Accidents

  1. Check if anyone is hurt.
  2. Check yourself and your passengers to see if anyone has been injured. If someone is hurt, summon medical assistance right away, or dial MMDA 1-3-6 and ask for a medical team and a traffic investigator to go to the scene.

  3. Make sure to take pictures of the accident.
  4. Once your condition and that of your passengers has been established, take pictures. This is the best arguing tool that you can have. Photos showing the vehicles and the surrounding area can help get you out of a bind if the other person denies what happened. Make sure to take pictures of both vehicles, (including license plates), and the area in which the accident occurred.

  5. Move your vehicle off to the side of the road if possible.
  6. It is unsafe to continue to sit in traffic and a two-car fender bender could turn into a multiple-car pileup very quickly. If you are unable to move your vehicle, make sure to stay in the area of the incident until the investigators arrives.

  7. Let the investigator take command of the situation, and institute measures to prevent the accident from getting worse.
  8. When the police arrive, you will want to get their names so that you can refer back them later when reviewing the accident details. Additionally, you shouldn't rely solely on the police report to tell your side of the story.

  9. Exchange information with the other driver.
  10. If involved in an accident with another driver, make sure to exchange the following information with that driver: name, address, phone number, insurance company, policy number, driver's license number and license plate number. You also should write a description of each vehicle, including the make, model, year and color.

  11. Contact your insurance company and know what your policy covers.
  12. After exchanging information with the other driver, you next move should be to contact your insurance company to let them know that you've been in an accident and to give them your version of the events. Additionally, you should be aware of what exactly your policy covers. You might find out that the actual cost to repair your car manageable enough to avoid going through your insurer and incurring a premium hike.

  13. File an accident report with the police department.
  14. Having a police report on hand can assist in speeding up the insurance claims process. You can file a report at your local police station.

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Rules on Plate Numbers

  1. CONDUCTION STICKERS
  2. All unregistered motor vehicles shall only be authorized to travel through the use of the Conduction Stickers, which should be prominently displayed on the right front windshield of each vehicle,

    The Conduction Sticker attached to a motor vehicle shall be valid until the vehicle is sold and delivered to the end-user who must apply for vehicle registration within 7 (seven) days from date of delivery.

    Only authorized and accredited driver of the manufacturer, assembler, importer, or dealer concerned is authorized to operate a vehicle travelling under the authority of the Conduction Sticker.

    The accredited driver should always carry the original Authority to Operate prescribed by the LTO whenever he or she travels under the authority of the Conduction Stickers.

  3. COMMEMORATIVE PLATES
  4. The commemorative plate shall not be superimposed over the regular plate. It shall be installed in front of a motor vehicle either at the right side or left side of the regular plate. As such the regular plate shall be maintained in the space provided for the purpose. Removal thereof shall be deemed as a violation. (based on LTO's A.O. AOL-2010-021)

    Placing the commemorative plate at the rear of a motor vehicle shall be strictly prohibited and penalized accordingly.

    The commemorative sticker should be pasted in the upper right hand corner of the front windshield. However, the regular validating windshield sticker shall be pasted at the left upper side of the front windshield.

    The issuance of commemorative plates/stickers shall be limited to the observance and/or commemoration of events which have: national significance certified by the department/agency concerned; historical significance certified by the National Historical Institute, and; international significance certified by the Department of Foreign Affairs.

    Any group, organization or association of Government Agency/Organization and Non-Government Organizations (NGO) may apply for the authority to use commemorative plates/stickers.

    It shall be issued and used with prior written approval of the Secretary of the DOTC, upon recommendation of the Assistant Secretary of the LTO.

    The display period for any commemorative plate shall be one (1) year from the month following its approval by the DOTC Secretary.

  5. LOST PLATE
  6. The MMDA and the LTO implement a "NO PLATE, NO TRAVEL" policy.

    If your plate was lost, file for an affidavit of loss and submit it to the LTO, and apply to get or use an improvised plate.

    Once authorized, make sure that the original copy of your Authority to Operate with the use of Improvised Plate is always carried by the driver on all his travels.

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Dengue Prevention Guide

  • Put holes on or crack open old tires to prevent the accumulation of water and the breeding of mosquitos.
  • Cover drums, pails and other water containers to prevent mosquitos from breeding inside it.
  • Replace the water inside flower pots and vases everyday.
  • Remove accumulated water from dish containers/drainers and refrigerators.
  • Clean the gutters of your house.
  • Throw away other possible breeding places of mosquitos, such as cans, bottles and bottle caps.

If you've had fever for at least 2 consecutive days, seek consultation in your nearest Health Center or Hospital.

For more information, contact the MMDA Health and Sanitation Office (882-0870) or call the MMDA Hotline (136)

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Disaster Awareness FAQ

TYPHOONS

What to do during Public Storm Signal No. 1:

  1. Listen to your radio for more information about weather disturbance.
  2. Check the ability of the house to withstand strong winds and strengthen it if necessary.
  3. The people are advised to monitor the latest severe weather Bulletin issued by PAGASA every six hours. In the meantime, business may be carried out as usual except when flood occurs.

What to do during Public Storm Signal No. 2:

  1. Special attention should be given to the latest position, the direction and speed movement as the cyclone may intensity and move towards the locality.
  2. The general public, especially people travelling by sea and air are cautioned to avoid unnecessary risks.
  3. Protect properties before signals are upgraded.
  4. Board up windows or put storm shutters in place and securely fasten it. Stay at home.

What to do during Public Storm Signal No. 3:

  1. Keep your radio on and listen to the latest news about typhoon.
  2. Everybody is advised to stay in safe and strong houses.
  3. Evacuate from low-lying areas to higher grounds.
  4. Stay away from coasts and riverbanks.
  5. Watch out for the passage of the "EYE" of the typhoon.

What to do during Public Storm Signal No. 4:

  1. Stay in safe houses or evacuation centers
  2. All travels and outdoor activities should be cancelled.

FLOODING

Preparation for Calamities particularly Flooding

  1. Regularly monitor your radio and television for calamity news updates.
  2. Prepare for enough candles, rechargeable lamps and flashlights for possible brownouts.
  3. If you reside in an area near the river, waterways, or mountainsides, immediately evacuate to prevent flashfloods and landslides.
  4. Store enough food, water, and first-aid kit.
  5. Prepare a list of emergency hotlines.

EARTHQUAKES

What to do BEFORE an Earthquake:

  1. The key to effective Disaster prevention is planning
    • Determine whether the site is along an active fault and/or prone to liquefaction or landslide which may cause damage to your house or building.
    • Be sure that proper structural design and engineering practice is followed when constructing a house or building.
    • Evaluate the structural soundness of buildings and important infrastructure; strengthen or retrofit if found necessary.
  2. Familiarize you self with your place of work and residence.
    • Identify relatively strong parts of the building like door jambs, near elevator shafts, sturdy , tables where you can take refuge during an earthquake.
    • Learn to use fire extinguishers, first aid kits, alarms and emergency exit. These should be accessible/conveniently located, and prominently marked.
  3. Prepare your place of work and residence for the event.
    • Strap heavy furniture/cabinets to the wall to prevent sliding or toppling.
    • Breakable items, harmful chemicals and flammable materials should be stored in the lowermost shelves and secured firmly.
    • Make it habit to turn of gas tanks when not in use.
  4. Most causes of injuries during earthquake are from falling objects.
    • Heavy materials should be kept in lower shelves.
    • Check the stability of hanging objects which may break loose and fall during earthquakes.
    • Prepare and maintain an earthquake survival kit consisting of battery powered radio, flashlight, first aid kit, potable water, candies, ready-to-eat food, whistle and dust mask.

What to do DURING an Earthquake:

  1. If you are inside a structurally sound building, stay there.
    • Protect your bodies from falling debris by bracing yourself in doorway or by getting under a sturdy desk or table.
  2. If you are outside, move to an open area.
    • Get away from power lines, posts, walls and other structures that may fall or collapse.
    • Stay away from buildings with glass panes.
    • If you are on a mountain or near steep hill slope, move away from steep escarpments which may be affected by landslide.
  3. When driving a vehicle, pull to the side of the road and stop.
    • Do not attempt to cross bridges or overpass which may have been damaged.
    • If you are along the shore and you feel a very strong earthquake, strong enough to make standing difficult, it is always safest to assume that tsunami (giant sea waves) has been triggered. Run away from the shore toward higher ground.

What to do AFTER an Earthquake:

  1. If you are inside an old, weak structure, take the fastest and safest away out!
    • Do not rush to the exit; get out calmly in an orderly manner.
    • Do not use elevators, use the stairs.
    • Check yourself and others for injuries.
  2. Help reduce the number of casualties from the earthquake.
    • Don't enter partially damage buildings; strong aftershocks may cause these collapse
    • Gather information and disaster prevention instructions from battery-operated radios.
    • Obey public safety precaution.
  3. Check your Surroundings.
    • Clean-up chemical spills, toxic and flammable materials to avoid any chain of unwanted events.
    • Check for fire and if any, have it controlled.
    • Check your water and electrical lines for defects, if any damage is suspected, turn the system off in the main valve or switch.
  4. Unless you need emergency help,:
    • Do not use your telephone to call relatives and friends. Disaster prevention authorities may need the line for emergency communication.
    • Do not use your car and drive around areas of damage, rescue and relief operations need the roads for mobility.
  5. If you must evacuate your residence, leave a message stating where you are going.
    • Take with you your earthquake survival kit, which should contain all necessary items for your protection and comforts.

EMERGENCY HOTLINES

MMDA
- 1-3-6

National Disaster Coordinating COUNCIL (NDCC)
- 0917 7334256; 734-2118; 7342120

PAGASA
- 433-ULAN (8526)

Department of Public Works and Highway (DPWH)
- 304-3713

Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG)
- 925-0343

Bureau of Fire Protection, National Capital Region
- 729-5166 or 407-1203

Red Cross
- 143/911-1876

Meralco
- 16211/ 0917-5592824

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10 Things That Drivers Should Know (Updated May 25, 2011)

  1. MMDA Enforcers are not allowed to group together while apprehending a motorist. They are not even allowed to stand together in groups of two (2) or more, except in actual times of special operations (e.g. apprehending groups of smoke-belching/colorum buses).
  2. Swerving is not a traffic violation per se. It is defined as a movement wherein vehicles shift from a lane to another. However, it can constitute the offense of reckless driving if it is done without precautions (e.g. swerving in an abrupt and careless manner, swerving without the use of signals, swerving across solid lines).

    Swerving can also constitute the offense of Disregarding Traffic Signs if there are signs present that explicitly prohibit swerving in the area.
  3. A driver's license cannot be confiscated by a Traffic Enforcer during traffic apprehensions except on the following situations:
    1. The driver was involved in a traffic accident
    2. The driver has accumulated three (3) or more unsettled violations
    3. The driver has been apprehended for the following violations:
    • Allowing another person to use driver's license
    • Broken sealing wire
    • Broken taximeter seal
    • Colorum operation (cargo/passenger vehicle)
    • Driving against traffic
    • Fake driver's license
    • Fake/altered taximeter seal
    • Fake/altered sealing wire
    • Fast/defective/non-operational/tampered taxi meter
    • Flagged up meter
    • Illegal or unauthorized counter-flow
    • Illegal transfer of plates/tags/stickers
    • Joined/reconnected sealing wire
    • No driver's ID
    • Ignoring Organized Bus Route (OBR) interval timers (for 2nd offense)
    • Skipping or bypassing designated OBR terminals or loading bays (for 2nd offense)
    • Operating on contractual basis
    • Out of line operation
    • Overcharging (with or without conductor) (for the 2nd offense)
    • Overspeeding
    • Refusal to convey passengers to destination/trip-cutting (Taxis and Public Utility Vehicles)
    • Refusal to render service to public (Taxis and Public Utility Vehicles)
    • Tampered sealing wire
    • Tampered taximeter seal
    • Tampering of OR/CR/CPC & other documents (spurious documents)
    • Undue preference/unjust discrimination
    • Using motor vehicle in commission of crime

    The above-mentioned administrative violations also require a minimum of 2 hours seminar (for the drivers) at the Traffic Academy.

    However, any driver who has committed three (3) or more unpaid violations, whether administrative or moving, shall also be subject to attending seminars, whose length shall be based on the results of the diagnostic exam (exam that will determine the contents of the seminar progress), which will be administered by the Agency.

    *Note: If the license is to be confiscated, the Traffic Enforcer should inform the driver of the reason/s for the confiscation and the ticket validity.

    If the driver refuses to surrender his driver's license, his plate may be detached pursuant to Section 74 & 75, MC 89-105.

  4. Private Vehicles are not allowed to use the yellow lane except when they are about to turn - provided that they start shifting lanes upon seeing the transition lane (broken white lines painted diagonally), that you can see around 50 meters away from an intersection. However, selective apprehension of private vehicles using the yellow lane is highly prohibited.
    The yellow lanes (1st and 2nd lanes in EDSA) are only for City Buses. City Buses are not allowed to go beyond the yellow lanes. If they do so, they will be apprehended for violating the yellow lane policy.
    Provincial buses are also not allowed to use the yellow lane. Instead, they are encouraged to use the third lane.
  5. Each Traffic Enforcer has his/her own written mission order issued by the MMDA Central Admin. Apprehended drivers are free to ask for the apprehending officer's mission order, which includes his area of responsibility, time of duty, official function. It also indicates whether or not the enforcer is authorized to issue tickets.
  6. Traffic Enforcers should issue TVR in complete uniform, with visible nameplates. Traffic Enforcers are instructed to accomplish the TVR (Traffic Violation Receipt) without any delay or argument on the road, so as to avoid traffic congestion.
  7. The Apprehending Enforcer is allowed to issue another TVR for Towing Fee. If the owner of the impounded vehicle fails to release his vehicle after payment of fine in the stipulated date, the impounding officer shall issue a separate TVR indicating no. of days it has remained at the impounding area.
  8. Before apprehending, the Traffic Enforcer should flag down the vehicle and lead it to the roadside where it will not obstruct the flow of traffic. Traffic Enforcers should courteously inform the driver of his violation.
  9. Traffic Enforcers are not allowed to ask drivers to alight from their vehicles while the apprehension is taking place. Most importantly, Traffic Enforcers are not allowed to ask or receive bribe money.
  10. During traffic apprehensions, the following can be considered as a valid driver's license:
  • ID Plastic Card
  • DLR / Temporary Driver's License
  • TOP (Temporary Operator's Permit)
  • International Driver's License
  • Foreign License

The Traffic Enforcer should exercise extra diligence in verifying the veracity of the data or documents presented.

If you encounter any Traffic Enforcer violating any of these, get the name of the Traffic Enforcer indicated on his/her name plate, and submit a letter of complaint addressed to the Traffic Adjudication Board (TAB), MMDA Bldg. EDSA cor. Orense St. Guadalupe Nuevo, Makati City, within 5 days after the apprehension.

In case you are involved in an argument with a Traffic Enforcer, call the MMDA Hotline 136, or the Metrobase at 0917-527-7304. Ask the Metrobase to send inspectors to go to the place where the argument is taking place for proper investigation.

You may also e-mail complaints against erring Traffic Enforcers to the MMDA thru email@mmda.gov.ph. Include full details of the incident (attach photos or videos if possible), so that they will be able to act promptly on the matter.

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What are the most recent rules on number coding (UVVRP), including changes per city/municipality?
(Updated December 6, 2011)

The Unified Vehicular Volume Reduction Program (UVVRP) or Number Coding Scheme starts at 7:00 am - 7:00 pm with window hours starting from 10:00 am - 3:00 in the afternoon.

The cities of Makati and Las Piñas do not implement window hours. Thus, number coding is strictly implemented from 7:00 am - 7:00 pm.

The city of Pasig implements its window hour from 9:00 am - 4:00 pm.

The city of Taguig does not implement the Number Coding Scheme within its internal roads. But the scheme is enforced on the National Roads within its boundaries, i.e. C5, East Service Road and Manuel L. Quezon.

The city of Parañaque implements the Number Coding Scheme, including the window hours (10:00am - 3:00pm), in the following roads:

  1. San Antonio Avenue, Pres. Aguinaldo St., Dominique Savio St., Japan St., Michael Rua St., and France St. in Barangay Don Bosco.
  2. E. Rodriguez St. in Barangay Moonwalk, Doña Soledad Extension and Doña Soledad Avenue in Barangay Don Bosco.
  3. East Service Road from Dr. Santos Avenue up to FTI Parañaque area.
  4. West Service Road from Dr. Santos Avenue up to Merville Park Subdivision Parañaque area

The cities of Marikina and Muntinlupa do not implement the Number Coding Scheme.

In addition, the following areas in Pasay do not implement the Number Coding Scheme: Ninoy Aquino Ave., MIA Road, Domestic Road, Airport Road, Sales Road, and portions of Buendia.

EDSA, C-5 Road, Diosdado Macapagal Avenue, and Roxas Boulevard are included in the implementation of Window Hours regardless of the city where they belong.

All Public Utility Buses (City and Provincial) are now covered under the Number Coding Scheme, with no "Window Hours". Motorcycles, on the other hand are exempted from the scheme.

All UVVRP exemptions and truck ban conduct passes granted in accordance with MMDA Regulation No. 96-005, as amended, MMDA Regulation 98-006-A, and MMDA Regulation 10-001 shall not include authority to use the Epifanio Delos Santos Avenue (EDSA).

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Number Coding Exemptions (Updated as of Nov. 12, 2010)

  1. Are Buses exempted from the Number Coding Scheme?
  2. Starting November 15, 2010, Public Utility Buses (City or Provincial) shall be covered under the Unified Vehicular Volume Reduction Program (UVVRP) from 7:00 A.M. to 7:00 P.M.

  3. Will there be "Window Hour" for Buses?
  4. There will not be any "Window Hour" for Buses. Thus, Number Coding shall be strictly imposed to them from 7:00 A.M. - 7:00 P.M.

  5. Who are automatically exempted from the Unified Vehicular Volume Reduction Program (UVVRP) or Number Coding Scheme?
  6. The following are automatically exempted from the UVVRP:

    1. DOT accredited tourism vehicles marked as such.
    2. Cargo trucks and other heavy vehicles, whether empty or loaded, as defined in Section 2 of MMC Ordinance No. 78-04, as amended, shall continue to be covered by MMA Ordinance No. 5, Series of 1994 governing Truck Ban.
    3. Ambulance, firetrucks, police patrol cars, military vehicles with permanent marking indicating vehicles as such. Ambulance and firetrucks which are privately owned and properly marked as such shall likewise be exempted.
    4. Vehicles commandeered by the government directed by a person in authority or his agent/or by a medical practitioner for military relief or emergency purposes.
    5. Vehicles carrying person/s needing immediate medical attention.
    6. Diplomatic vehicles with diplomatic plates.
    7. MMDA accredited tow trucks provided that the accreditation papers must be carried and ready for presentation upon request.
    8. Government vehicles with government plates or appropriate LTO stickers with permanent markings expressly showing the name of government agency or office, including those vehicles of Members of Congress with officially issued LTO protocol plates and being utilized in the performance of their functions.
    9. MMDA accredited tow trucks provided that the accreditation papers must be carried and ready for presentation upon request.
    10. Vehicles delivering perishable goods in commercial quantity.
    11. Motorcycles pursuant to MMDA Memorandum Circular No. 96-005B (1998)

  7. Who are those who still need to apply for exemption?
  8. The MMDA shall issue exemption certificates and conduct passes in accordance with MMDA Regulation No. 96-005, as amended, MMDA Regulation 98-006-A, and MMDA Regulation 10-001, to the following vehicles:

    1. Duly enfranchised school buses, including school buses with provisional authority by the Land Transportation Franchising Regulatory Board (LTFRB), with appropriate LTO stickers and markings. Company buses/shuttle service ferrying employees for free and with appropriate LTO stickers and markings are also exempted.
    2. Official media vehicles with corresponding markings showing name/logo of the media firm and duly registered under the said firm as evidenced by valid registration papers. Privately owned vehicles being used by media personalities on official duties as attested by the concerned editor/publisher/station manager, are exempted provided that the written authority aforementioned is carried and ready for presentation upon request. A signboard, indicating the media establishment represented, shall likewise be conspicuously displayed on the vehicle.
    3. Vehicles used by medical practitioners in an emergency.
    4. Vehicles on a mission to carry relief goods to identified calamity or highly depressed areas.

    All UVVRP exemptions and truck ban conduct passes granted under this section shall not include authority to use the Epifanio Delos Santos Avenue (EDSA).

    Pursuant to MMDA Regulation No. 98-006-A, conduct passes shall be granted to the following on a limited basis:

    1. Heavy vehicles delivering petroleum products,
    2. Heavy vehicles undertaking international messengerial services,
    3. Heavy vehicles utilized as garbage trucks,
    4. Emergency heavy vehicles of power and water companies,
    5. Heavy vehicles being utilized by the government in the construction of flagship projects as identified by the MMDA and subject to the issuance of a valid certification and trip pass by the government authority concerned such as the DPWH, DOTC, LGUs, PEA, at al.
    6. Heavy vehicles carrying perishable goods in commercial quantity.

    The Chairman of MMDA may grant additional temporary exemptions pursuant to existing regulations based on highly exceptional circumstances.

    Exemption certificates which were previously issued but are no longer covered by exemptions enumerated under this circular are hereby revoked accordingly.

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What is the procedure in applying for UVVRP (Number Coding) exemption?

  1. Submit a letter of request addressed to the Office of the Chairman - MMDA (MMDA Main Bldg. EDSA cor. Orense St. Guadalupe Nuevo, Makati City).
  2. Submit a photocopy of the OR/CR of your vehicle.
  3. Upon approval, the applicant should pay an amount of P500 to the 6th floor (Treasury Department), for an exemption covering the period until December 30, 2011.

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What is the procedure in settling your outstanding ticket?

  1. Just go to the nearest branch of Metrobank and fill-up the payment form (entity number, driver's name, and amount of violation), not more than 7 days after the occurrence of the apprehension. After the payment, make sure to keep the Official Receipt for possible future reference.
  2. Or. . .

  3. Proceed to the Treasury Operation Service (6th floor of MMDA Main Building, EDSA Cor. Orense St. Guadalupe Nuevo, Makati City) and present your ticket together with your payment.

For those drivers who are already included in the LTO Alarm List, here are the ways to settle your violation:

  1. Secure a number and fill-up the Application Form (Information Table).
  2. Pay Clearance Fee (P30.00) at the Treasury Operation Service (TOS).
  3. Wait for number to be called for submission of documents for verification.
  4. Proceed to Window assignment for assessment of fines based on computer verification and manual verification (old TVR's). for drivers with 3 or more violations are advised to proceed to the Traffic Academy for seminar.
  5. Pay fine/s at TOS Cashier.
  6. Return the Official Receipt (OR) of payment at the assigned window for issuance of clearance.
  7. Proceed to Lifters of Alarm window.

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What is the protocol for Traffic Officers when apprehending traffic violators?

  1. Flag down the vehicle and lead it to the roadside where it will not obstruct the flow of traffic.
  2. Courteously inform the driver of his violation.
  3. Request for the Drivers license, vehicle registration and other pertinent documents.
  4. Verify records of driver from Central Database.
  5. Inform the driver of his previous records should there be any.
  6. Accomplish TVR without unnecessary delay / argument.
  7. Issue the second copy to the driver / motorist and inform him / her where and when to pay his / her fine.

APPREHENSION DIALOGUE

  • Greet the driver with respect and identify yourself
  • Inform the driver of his violation
  • State your authority
  • Respectfully ask for his driver's license
  • Inform the driver not to alight from the vehicle
  • Should there be any complaint. State the availability of the TAB for lodging a complaint within (5) days or the Roadside Traffic Arbitration during apprehension (on site).

Sample apprehension dialogue:

Good Morning ! Sir/Madam. I am Traffic Officer Juan Dela Cruz, You violated a traffic rule, you obstructed the flow of traffic. Under MMDA law (R.A 7924) I am authorized to confiscate your license should there be a need to do so. May I have your driver's license please. You are also requested Sir/Madam, not to alight from your vehicle.

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